Very Superstitious, Writing’s on the Wall…

October 17, 2014 at 12:06 pm

There has to be rules and procedures on a boat.  There has to be order in case something untoward happens so everyone knows what to do, and the pliers, or knife, or bolt cutters have been put back in the correct place, and the quick release knot has been correctly tied on the liferaft etc.  Efficiency (and safety) on a boat is mostly about procedures and tasks being correctly completed (skills), proper maintenance (discipline), and planning for the unforeseen (strategy).

But at sea there is much that you can’t control, and anyone who ever spends any time at sea will gain a deep sensitivity to the raw fickleness of the elements, and just how quickly it can change. I guess to help regain some sort of sense of control, sailors were (are?) a superstitious lot.

I find these old superstitions rather fascinating… And there are lots! I’ve put this list together:

 

Sailing Superstitions

 

But how did these seemingly rather random superstitions come into existence? Presumably someone once did one of these ‘things’, and then something bad happened, and the ‘thing’ got the blame. That’s my logic anyway, and it gives me a vivid image of someone sinking after taking the vicar round the bay for a Sunday afternoon jolly.

The observant amongst you will notice that there is one very well known one missing.  But how can I possibly have ‘No women aboard‘ on here?

Have I missed any others? Do you know any more?

5 Things that Worked Well (and 5 that Didn’t…)

October 5, 2014 at 10:30 am

So, after a summer of cruising, here are 5 things that worked very well…

#1 Cheapie Battery Monitor off eBay

Hopefully you’ve seen my previous post on what this is, but I was rather pleased how well this worked! I used my multimeter a couple of times to compare results, and the multimeter always showed a couple of points above the plug in, which I’m OK with as I would rather it under reported than over reported… When the solar panel is charging it can over-read, but they do say that you should leave a battery half an hour to settle after charging before taking a reading.

Cost: £4

12v Voltage Meter hurley 22 duet

#2 Barton Winchers

Once I’d got these on, they were great.  They worked really well with 3 turns of my sheets round them (without even trying to get the sheet into the groove on the top).  The only time they slipped was when I clearly needed to reef.

Cost: £60 odd… But worth it I think!

Barton Winchers Hurley 22

 

#3 Oilie Stowage

After a few weeks of cruising I realised that what with the vaguaries of the British Summer I needed to have my oilies to hand from the cockpit. If I left them on the quarter berth they would without fail end up on the floor and out of reach from the tiller.  So I put this together from a piece of decking teak bought at Beaulieu that I just varnished, and then added some brass hooks from the Pound Shop.  I stuck it on with some 2 part epoxy glue and it was pretty life changing to be honest.  Funny the little things…. Pretty proud of the mitre too. It fits nicely and looks good.

Cost: £1 for wood, £2 for hooks, £6 for glue

Coat Rack Hurley 22

#4 Cider Jug

I’m not going go into detail but hopefully you can guess its use?  Much safer than dangling over the stern, use a cider jug in the cockpit and then tie a sheet to the handle and just lob the lot over the side (downwind). Perhaps more useful to the singlehander, as with crew where a modicum more privacy might be appreciated?  Don’t forget to bring it back aboard after 5 minutes or so… It will slow you down 0.3 of a knot (I know this for a fact).

I also found that initiating its use was generally likely to invite a search and rescue helicopter flypast. Maybe it was a question on my CG66? I must amend that…

Cost: Free

Cider Jug Hurley 22

#5 Galley Storage

I wasn’t sure if these would be secure enough.  They were.  Even though the compass on a few occasions became unfastened from its stowage and ended up on the floor, the cutlery and salt and pepper never did! Thank you IKEA.

Cost: 60p for cutlery holder, £3 for salt and pepper holders

Galley Stowage Hurley 22

#5 Galley Storage

——————

And now 5 things that were a bit disappointing…

#1 The Tender

I bought a secondhand inflatable from Bussell’s before I left Weymouth, as every cruising yacht needs a dinghy, right? Well, er no I don’t think so.  I towed it about for a couple of weeks and then stowed it behind the mast before I left Portland to go round The Bill. 400 miles and 14 harbours later it hadn’t moved.  At 2.3m it is over 1/3 of the length of Duet and it is a small tender! In all the harbours I have been to I either had a walk ashore mooring, was on a buoy and there was a water taxi service, or I was at anchor and probably wouldn’t have felt comfortable going ashore and leaving Duet on her own anyway.  Admittedly the water taxi’s weren’t *that* cheap (from £3 to £5 per person return) which can quickly add up if you are crewed, or want lots of trips ashore.  But if you have crew, then presumably you would also have assistance to get the thing blown up and launched. Not sure it works for a singlehander.

Okay, so it could also be deployed as a liferaft in the event of a sinking, but I’m not even sure I could have done it on my own, and I don’t think the cockpit is big enough!  Blowing it up from the water doesn’t even bear thinking about. Besides, I have not so far been that offshore.  And I have a PLB on my lifejacket…  The dinghy’s going on eBay.

Cost: £150

Dinghy Stowage Hurley 22

#2 Bungee Self Steering

So I got this working twice, when the wind was forward of the beam.  All the other times, either the sea state or the wind was too high and I had to hand helm. I need better power and a tiller pilot, or a wind vane.

Cost: £5

#3 My phone.

I got my smartphone wet rounding The Bill and fried it. I bought a cheapie replacement phone in Bridport, but I then had no easy internet access for the weather etc.  Annoying as I actually have an Aquapac Stormproof cover, but wasn’t using it. Lesson learnt.

Cost: £hundreds…

#4 The Rigging Tuning

I messed about all summer with the rigging tension, and it’s still not right. There’s too much pre-bend now, and I think I need to slacken it all off and start again! The mast’s coming down for the winter anyway… There will be more on this I’m sure.

Cost: FREE

Hurley 22

#5 The Compass

Duet came with a big bracket mounted compass that is fixed just below the companionway in the cockpit on a removable bracket.  It looks retro and cool. However, it makes getting in and out of the companionway in anything other than a flat calm more tricky.  It’s also showing nearly 20 degrees deviation, and is invisible in the dark (no backlight or glow in the dark markings).  Sadly it has to be replaced (but I actually have a plastimo bulkhead compass on my day boat so I might just swap them.)

Cost: FREE (came with boat)

Would love to hear what you found this summer…

Winter Layup

September 22, 2014 at 10:58 am

Weatherweb was saying the high at the beginning of September was only going to be short lived, and by the time it was apparent it was sticking around a little longer I had made plans that could not be altered.  So Duet’s been out of the water a couple of weeks now and I’ve been off to Norfolk to collect the van and the dog (and been to Ireland but that’s another story… And the Southampton Boat Show, but that’s another story again!).

I went back to her yesterday to empty her and finish the layup. She looks pretty tired.  She’s been pressure washed and much of the boot top has come off and her topsides are quite stained too which is kinda sad, but on the other hand it’s all the mark of an awesome summer (and I know the yellow will come off with some Cillit Bang and elbow grease).

We filled the van. Amazing how much stuff she holds really…

Hurley 22 Winter Layup

So much stuff!

Duet’s layup procedure is pretty straightforward, as she is a pretty simple boat.  There is minimal plumbing to worry about and no inboard to winterise. It’s just a case of trying to minimise decay and corrosion really.

This is what I’ve done so far:

  • Removed the sails (which will go in to R&J Sails for a check over and to be laundered.  I also want a 3rd reefing point put on the main).
  • Removed all the running rigging from mast.  Ropes have been brought home for a wash and check over.
  • Removed the dodgers.
  • Really good clean inside, round the cooker and in the lockers.
  • Remove all food, cushions from forepeak, books, charts, anything paper, anything fabric (including the curtains), any removeable electronics and anything with a battery.
  • Rinse over the interior with a cloth with water and a little bit of bleach (as there is salt residue on everything which will attract damp).
  • Rinse out the bilge with fresh water and dry it with a cloth.
  • I’ve taken the dinghy and outboard off for safe storage.  Though I want to sell the dinghy – it’s too big!
  • The pans and cooking utensils have all been washed and stored in an airtight box with some big silica gel packets.
  • I’ve left the remaining cushions up ended and the lockers are all open to allow air to flow.
  • The water tank is empty and my water containers have been left with the lids off.
  • I’ve left all the seacocks open so the cockpit will drain when it rains.

I still want to step the mast, as I want to check over the work I did earlier in the year, but it was a bit windy and I thought it was safer to leave it up til I was ready to work on the mast and get it back up as soon as possible afterwards.  I had to repeatedly tighten the standing rigging over the summer I’ve wondered if hull sagged when the mast was down for a couple of months.  Apparently this can happen (and Contessa 26’s are notorious for it apparently?)  and with the Hurley’s propensity to mast compression I have wondered if this was the reason my rigging kept going slack…

I also still need to get the ouboard off and serviced, but I’ve rinsed the lazarette out with fresh water.

Duet’s iroko rubbing strake was looking a bit battered, even though I’d given it a top up coat of oil a month or so ago.  She had a green scrape down one side from a starboard marker in Poole Harbour, and the anchor chain had rubbed the bow.  So we gave it a rub over with some wet and dry, a rinse with white spirit and it got 2 coats of Deks Olje D1 which will hopefully stop it going grey over the winter and give me an easier job to do come spring.

I just need to think about my winter to-do list now…

Hurley 22 Winter Layup

Tucked up ready for winter. She’s chocked this year rather than in a cradle… but I’m not sure how I’m going to repaint that boot top?

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close